structure

There are four divisions of greentomato: partnerships, education, intellectual property and an investment vehicle.

PARTNERSHIPS explores and develops projects with appropriate companies, individuals and other entities, with a view to generating a profit. This is the point of contact for parties interested either in collaborating with existing brand entities (greentomatocars franchises, strategic alliances, sponsorship etc.), or proposing new ideas that resonate with the brand’s values. EDUCATION exists to build the greentomato brand through generating, nurturing, developing and communicating ideas that share greentomato values and are not-for-profit. These ideas may or may not be part of greentomato. The entity hosts a think tank, forums and debates (on and off-line), runs education programmes and events (including fund-raising) manages newsletters, blogs and is a hub for a community of like-minded people and companies. The education entity is very active online. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY owns greentomato’s IP and executes transactions relating to the IP. IP’s principal activity is granting licenses to the operating companies or partners (e.g. franchises or other licenses). INVESTMENT VEHICLE : owns the operating companies, raises and administers financing for new business ventures and partnerships, and generates shareholder information. Relevant transactions are evaluated by the education and partnerships divisions and presented to the holding board for approval before being passed to the investment vehicle for execution.
structure

It isn’t sunny enough for solar panels to work in the UK.

Truth: The UK receives between 1200... read more

It isn’t sunny enough for solar panels to work in the UK.

Truth: The UK receives between 1200 and 700 kWh of solar energy per metre squared. This might not mean much to you, but every meter squared of your house receives enough energy to meet a quarter of your electricity demand. PV panels are then able to convert between 12% and 18% of that into electricity for your home. The town of Freiberg in southern Germany is home to the largest solar PV plant in Europe and across the entire town solar PV provides 35% of electricity demand. Despite having a total installed capacity of 3,200 kW, Freiberg receives less solar radiation per square metre than southern UK.