structure

There are four divisions of greentomato: partnerships, education, intellectual property and an investment vehicle.

PARTNERSHIPS explores and develops projects with appropriate companies, individuals and other entities, with a view to generating a profit. This is the point of contact for parties interested either in collaborating with existing brand entities (greentomatocars franchises, strategic alliances, sponsorship etc.), or proposing new ideas that resonate with the brand’s values. EDUCATION exists to build the greentomato brand through generating, nurturing, developing and communicating ideas that share greentomato values and are not-for-profit. These ideas may or may not be part of greentomato. The entity hosts a think tank, forums and debates (on and off-line), runs education programmes and events (including fund-raising) manages newsletters, blogs and is a hub for a community of like-minded people and companies. The education entity is very active online. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY owns greentomato’s IP and executes transactions relating to the IP. IP’s principal activity is granting licenses to the operating companies or partners (e.g. franchises or other licenses). INVESTMENT VEHICLE : owns the operating companies, raises and administers financing for new business ventures and partnerships, and generates shareholder information. Relevant transactions are evaluated by the education and partnerships divisions and presented to the holding board for approval before being passed to the investment vehicle for execution.
structure

Flying is ok because aviation only produces a few percent of global CO2 emissions.

Truth: Globally, it is true... read more

Flying is ok because aviation only produces a few percent of global CO2 emissions.


Truth: Globally, it is true that aviation does not produce more than a few percent of CO2. However if you take a single intercontinental flight every year, this is likely to dominate your own personal CO2 emissions.
More importantly, emitting the gas high up in the atmosphere means that the global warming effect of every tonne of CO2 emitted by a plane is 2-4 times worse than that of the same tonne emitted on the ground!
Another problem is the speed of growth of the aviation industry: between 1990 and 2001, UK passenger numbers increased by 73%. Over the same period, average fuel consumption per passenger per kilometre travelled actually increased by 12%!  In 2008, aviation was responsible for 23% of transport fuel use in the UK.